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Thursday, May 3

  1. page Sheldon Daye edited Abuse is too treat with cruelty or violence on a repeative or consistent term. There are many difft…
    Abuse is too treat with cruelty or violence on a repeative or consistent term. There are many difftent type of forms of abuse, there is verbal, assault, and last but not least sexually. In the U.S. sexual abuse is happening every 2 minutes thats 720 times a DAY!!! Just think, while we're seating back playing or video games, drinking our coffee, or even studying fro a math exam; there somebody getting sexually abused. Sexual abuse can scar a person mentally, physically and emotionally. Abuse will also hinder a person growing and developmental process. The Bean Trees a book written by Barbara Kingsolver is a great example of how not just sexual abuse but emotional abuse is occuring in todays society.
    ...
    physical growth.
    I really never had a thought or felt any type of way of people being abused. I thought it was just a figure of speech or just thought less about it. Because of ignorance of the fact and lack of knowledge. As I have grown older and looked at life at a difftent perspective. Talked too a couple of people. Some of close loved ones have been abused and it still stick in there mind today. I would say its a chain reaction. Due to unjustice and unforgivness. This could change a persons life in a blink of an eye. So lets not be ignorant too the fact that its happening right now as you read this documentation. And lets get up and fight!!!!!
    (view changes)
    6:29 am
  2. page Sheldon Daye edited Abuse is too treat with cruelty or violence on a repeative or consistent term. There are many diff…
    Abuse is too treat with cruelty or violence on a repeative or consistent term. There are many difftent type of forms of abuse, there is verbal, assault, and last but not least sexually. In the U.S. sexual abuse is happening every 2 minutes thats 720 times a DAY!!! Just think, while we're seating back playing or video games, drinking our coffee, or even studying fro a math exam; there somebody getting sexually abused. Sexual abuse can scar a person mentally, physically and emotionally. Abuse will also hinder a person growing and developmental process. The Bean Trees a book written by Barbara Kingsolver is a great example of how not just sexual abuse but emotional abuse is occuring in todays society.
    In the book The Bean Trees a child by the name of Turtle was sexually assaulted at a age thats too young do even dare dream of. It put her in a stat of mind of not wanting to talk or compel to show affection in a childly state. Hindering a developmental stage and mental a physical growth.
    I really never had a thought or felt any type of way of people being abused. I thought it was just a figure of speech or just thought less about it. Because of ignorance of the fact and lack of knowledge. As I have grown older and looked at life at a difftent perspective. Talked too a couple of people. Some of close loved ones have been abused and it still stick in there mind today. I would say its a chain reaction. Due to unjustice and unforgivness. This could change a persons life in a blink of an eye. So lets not be ignorant too the fact that its happening right now as you read this documentation. And lets get up and fight!!!!!

    (view changes)
    6:29 am

Wednesday, May 2

  1. page Luzmina Garner edited ... Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. …
    ...
    Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. Far more womanly in a traditional sense than Taylor is, she pines for her husband and expresses her conviction that marriages and love should last forever. But, she undergoes a transformation from dependent housewife into strong single mother. She searches for a job and accepts that she will have to support herself. She acts more boldly, scolding Taylor when Taylor does not fight hard for her rights.
    Lou Ann is both a new mother and recently separated from her husband, Angel, who leaves her on Halloween, shortly before she gives birth to a son, Dwayne Ray. Lou Ann is a bundle of neuroses and fears, considering every single unlikely calamity that may befall her or her son because of a dream that she considered prophetic that foretold that her son would not live to see the year two thousand. In contrast to the confident Taylor, who becomes her roommate, Lou Ann is perpetually worried about what others will think about her, and fears saying the wrong thing and offending friends who may abandon her. However, through the course of the novel Lou Ann becomes more confident and calm, particularly after taking a job at Red Hot Mama's salsa factory and channeling her nervous energy into fervor for work there.
    ...
    Lou Ann Ruiz,feel.Ruiz, feel. After spending
    (view changes)
    5:37 pm

Tuesday, May 1

  1. page Luzmina Garner edited ... In The Bean Tree, Kingsolver focuses on a young woman, Taylor Greer, who develops a strong soc…
    ...
    In The Bean Tree, Kingsolver focuses on a young woman, Taylor Greer, who develops a strong social conscience through her experiences with an abandoned child, and a pair of Guatemalan Refugees. The Protagonist of the novel, Taylor is determined to avoid becoming a pregnant teen. Her early years in Eastern Kentucky have been heavily influence by her perception that Pittman County is "behind the nation in practically every way you can think of, except the rate of teenage pregnancies.” Taylor is independent and assertive, believing that she does not need and will never need a man, and firmly avoids marriage and children until, upon finally leaving Pittman County; she ac­quires an unwanted and abused Cherokee baby girl outside a bar in Oklahoma. She names the baby Turtle, for her habit of "holding on." The Bean Tree is in many ways the story of Taylor's growth and maturation, as she begins to realize her place in a vast world and learns to accept the possibility of love, both romantic and parental. Taylor contrasts with Lou Ann Ruiz who settled in Tucson with her baby, Dwayne Ray. Her husband, Angel, has just walked out on her when the story begins, and Taylor and Turtle move in with her.
    Taylor Greer is brave; practical and unpredictable young woman. Taylor’s spirited, quirky voice shapes the novel. She perceives things in an original fashion, communicating her wonder at the customs and landscape of the Southwest with unusual metaphors and folksy language. Taylor settles in Tucson, Arizona, because its landscape strikes her as outlandish; newness and amusement appeal to her more than comfort or familiarity. As she contends with dangerous poverty, an unasked-for child, and many other trials, Taylor’s wit and spirit remain intact. Taylor cares for the abandoned and the exiled with increasing enthusiasm as the novel progresses. Taylor is an archetypal
    ...
    permanently enshrouds Esperanza'lsEsperanza's life, Taylor
    ...
    her happiness. Unlike She becomes even woldierworldlier after learning
    Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. Far more womanly in a traditional sense than Taylor is, she pines for her husband and expresses her conviction that marriages and love should last forever. But, she undergoes a transformation from dependent housewife into strong single mother. She searches for a job and accepts that she will have to support herself. She acts more boldly, scolding Taylor when Taylor does not fight hard for her rights.
    Lou Ann is both a new mother and recently separated from her husband, Angel, who leaves her on Halloween, shortly before she gives birth to a son, Dwayne Ray. Lou Ann is a bundle of neuroses and fears, considering every single unlikely calamity that may befall her or her son because of a dream that she considered prophetic that foretold that her son would not live to see the year two thousand. In contrast to the confident Taylor, who becomes her roommate, Lou Ann is perpetually worried about what others will think about her, and fears saying the wrong thing and offending friends who may abandon her. However, through the course of the novel Lou Ann becomes more confident and calm, particularly after taking a job at Red Hot Mama's salsa factory and channeling her nervous energy into fervor for work there.
    (view changes)
    6:31 pm
  2. page Luzmina Garner edited ... hero: she leaves her home and family, descends into darkness, and reemerges to accomplish some…
    ...
    hero: she leaves her home and family, descends into darkness, and reemerges to accomplish some good for the sake of her society. She also functions as Esperanza's comedic counterpart. Whereas tragedy permanently enshrouds Esperanza'ls life, Taylor has a chance to hold on to her daughter and her happiness. Unlike She becomes even woldier after learning about the political corruption and personal tragedy faced by Estevan and Esperanza and the abuse inflicted on Turtle. Her sympathetic reaction to the difficulties of others reveals Taylor's tenderheartedness.
    Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. Far more womanly in a traditional sense than Taylor is, she pines for her husband and expresses her conviction that marriages and love should last forever. But, she undergoes a transformation from dependent housewife into strong single mother. She searches for a job and accepts that she will have to support herself. She acts more boldly, scolding Taylor when Taylor does not fight hard for her rights.
    ...
    work there. Lou
    Lou
    Ann is
    ...
    more self-confidence. In the end, Lou Ann and Taylor form a functional family, caring for their children and for each other.
    Lou Ann is more uptight, strict, and very protective over Dwayne-Ray. Whereas Taylor is more free will and lets Turtle do her own thing, but they both still adore their children very much. The difference between Lou Ann and Taylor is that Lou Ann is depressed throughout most of the book and Taylor is upbeat and positive. The different ways of Taylor being stable and Lou Ann's being insecure eventually lend them to be the perfect roommates and the best of friends. Taylor is quite confident and headstrong. She is unwavering in her determination, and frequently sustains herself through the confidence in her that her mother and her best friend, Lou Ann Ruiz, feel. After spending time with Taylor, who is a strong person, Lou Ann takes steps that allo
    In the
    (view changes)
    6:08 pm
  3. page Luzmina Garner edited ... hero: she leaves her home and family, descends into darkness, and reemerges to accomplish some…
    ...
    hero: she leaves her home and family, descends into darkness, and reemerges to accomplish some good for the sake of her society. She also functions as Esperanza's comedic counterpart. Whereas tragedy permanently enshrouds Esperanza'ls life, Taylor has a chance to hold on to her daughter and her happiness. Unlike She becomes even woldier after learning about the political corruption and personal tragedy faced by Estevan and Esperanza and the abuse inflicted on Turtle. Her sympathetic reaction to the difficulties of others reveals Taylor's tenderheartedness.
    Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. Far more womanly in a traditional sense than Taylor is, she pines for her husband and expresses her conviction that marriages and love should last forever. But, she undergoes a transformation from dependent housewife into strong single mother. She searches for a job and accepts that she will have to support herself. She acts more boldly, scolding Taylor when Taylor does not fight hard for her rights.
    ...
    work there.
    Lou
    Lou Ann is more uptight, strict, andstrict,and very protective
    ...
    her own thing,thin, but they
    ...
    their children veryso much. The
    ...
    Ann and Tayloraylor is that
    ...
    the perfect roommatesroomates and the
    ...
    confidence in her, her that her mothermother, and her
    ...
    Lou Ann Ruiz, feel.Ruiz,feel. After spending
    ...
    who is a strong person,
    ...
    allow her to gain more self-confidence. SheIn the end, Lou Ann and Taylor
    ...
    each other.
    Lou Ann is more uptight, strict, and very protective over Dwayne-Ray. Whereas Taylor is more free will and lets Turtle do her own thing, but they both still adore their children very much.
    The difference
    ...
    and positive. The different ways of Taylor being stable and Lou Ann's being insecure eventually lend them to be the perfect roommates and the best of friends. Taylor is quite confident and headstrong. She is unwavering in her determination, and frequently sustains herself through the confidence in her that her mother and her best friend, Lou Ann Ruiz, feel. After spending time with Taylor, who is a strong person, Lou Ann takes steps that allo In the
    (view changes)
    6:02 pm
  4. page Idalia Garcia-Portillo edited Idalia l. Garcia portillo RED 090 Mrs. Ela Browder 01 May 2012 Motherhood In the novel, The B…
    Idalia l. Garcia portillo
    RED 090
    Mrs. Ela Browder
    01 May 2012
    Motherhood
    In the novel, The Bean Trees, by Barbara Kingsolver, we watch as Taylor grows a great deal. This young woman takes on a huge commitment of caring for a child that doesn't even belong to her. The friends that she acquired along the way help teach her about love and responsibility, and those friends become family to her and Turtle. Having no experience in motherhood, she muddles through the best she can, as all mothers do. Marietta was raised in a small town in Kentucky. When she became an adult, she decided she needed a change. She wanted a different name and a different place to call home. She got in her Volkswagen, started driving, and on this journey she changed her name to Taylor. A stranger gave her a three year old Indian child to take care of, who she names Turtle. The two finally settle down in Tucson, where they live with a single mom who is also from a small town in Kentucky. Taylor works for a woman who hides political refugees in her home, and Taylor becomes good friends with two of them. These two refugees act as Turtle's parents and sign over custody to Taylor, so that Turtle could become her daughter legally. Taylor was very unsure about whether or not she would be a good mom, but in the end she realizes that Turtle belongs with her, and that Tucson is home.
    The first half of The Bean Trees was hard to stay interested in. Although the book had a lot of action, it could have been spread out more. It wasn't until the middle of the book that we found out what was medically wrong with Turtle, why she was so lethargic. Considering this child was such a major part of Taylor's life, and would change her future completely, she was not talked about as much as she could have been. It's like half the time she forgot Turtle was there. It’s funny how people don't give that much thought to what kids want, as long as they're being quiet. I understand that Turtle was just dropped in Taylor's lap, but I still think Turtle deserved to have more attention given to her than she did. I would have liked Turtle to have been the child that was taken from the refugees; the refugee woman showed her so much love. "I couldn't have taken her from Esperanza. If she had asked I couldn't have said no". I think they would have loved her much more.
    What I liked about the story was how interesting the end was; I could not put it down. I had to find out if Taylor decided to keep the child. Taylor's friendship with Lou Ann was a nice addition to the story; they helped each other out in different ways. Taylor was a strong independent person, anyone who would leave their home town with no idea where they were going and in a vehicle with no starter, is a pretty determined person. Although I admired Taylor's character, Turtle was what kept me wanting to read more, wanting to know why she never moved or made a sound. After a while I began to wonder if perhaps she was dead. I was glad when Taylor finally took her to the doctor; it was interesting following that part of the story. These are healed fractures, some of them compound. This child had been through a lot. Mattie, Taylor's friend and boss that was secretly hiding refugees in her business, was an important part of the book. It tied in great with them being able to sign custody of Turtle to Taylor.

    (view changes)
    5:01 pm
  5. page Luzmina Garner edited ... Ruiz: Different people, similar lives People, Similar Lives In The ... of "holding …
    ...
    Ruiz: Different people, similar livesPeople, Similar Lives
    In The
    ...
    of "holding on."Theon." The Bean Tree
    Taylor Greer is brave; practical and unpredictable young woman. Taylor’s spirited, quirky voice shapes the novel. She perceives things in an original fashion, communicating her wonder at the customs and landscape of the Southwest with unusual metaphors and folksy language. Taylor settles in Tucson, Arizona, because its landscape strikes her as outlandish; newness and amusement appeal to her more than comfort or familiarity. As she contends with dangerous poverty, an unasked-for child, and many other trials, Taylor’s wit and spirit remain intact. Taylor cares for the abandoned and the exiled with increasing enthusiasm as the novel progresses. Taylor is an archetypal
    ...
    reveals Taylor's tenderheartedness
    aylor cares for the abandoned and the exiled with increasing enthusiasm as the novel progresses. Mattie calls her a hero for risking her own safety in order to achieve a more just society. In some ways, Taylor is an archetypal hero: she leaves her home and family, descends into darkness, and reemerges to accomplish some good for the sake of her society. She also functions as Esperanza’s comedic counterpart. Whereas tragedy permanently enshrouds Esperanza’s life, Taylor has a chance to hold on to her daughter and her happiness. Unlike traditional female heroines, Taylor’s adventures do not revolve around finding or keeping a man. Her life focuses instead on females—primarily on Turtle-- but also on her mother, her friend, and her mentor. The male-female love she experiences remains purely platonic. She becomes even worldlier after learning about the political corruption and personal tragedy faced by Estevan and Esperanza and the abuse inflicted on Turtle. Her sympathetic reaction to the difficulties of others reveals Taylor’s
    tenderheartedness.
    Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. Far more womanly in a traditional sense than Taylor is, she pines for her husband and expresses her conviction that marriages and love should last forever. But, she undergoes a transformation from dependent housewife into strong single mother. She searches for a job and accepts that she will have to support herself. She acts more boldly, scolding Taylor when Taylor does not fight hard for her rights.
    Lou Ann is both a new mother and recently separated from her husband, Angel, who leaves her on Halloween, shortly before she gives birth to a son, Dwayne Ray. Lou Ann is a bundle of neuroses and fears, considering every single unlikely calamity that may befall her or her son because of a dream that she considered prophetic that foretold that her son would not live to see the year two thousand. In contrast to the confident Taylor, who becomes her roommate, Lou Ann is perpetually worried about what others will think about her, and fears saying the wrong thing and offending friends who may abandon her. However, through the course of the novel Lou Ann becomes more confident and calm, particularly after taking a job at Red Hot Mama's salsa factory and channeling her nervous energy into fervor for work there.
    (view changes)
    2:10 pm
  6. page Luzmina Garner edited Taylor Taylor Green and In The Bean Tree, Kingsolver focuses on a young woman, Taylor Greer, w…
    TaylorTaylor Green and
    In The Bean Tree, Kingsolver focuses on a young woman, Taylor Greer, who develops a strong social conscience through her experiences with an abandoned child, and a pair of Guatemalan Refugees. The Protagonist of the novel, Taylor is determined to avoid becoming a pregnant teen. Her early years in Eastern Kentucky have been heavily influence by her perception that Pittman County is "behind the nation in practically every way you can think of, except the rate of teenage pregnancies.” Taylor is independent and assertive, believing that she does not need and will never need a man, and firmly avoids marriage and children until, upon finally leaving Pittman County; she ac­quires an unwanted and abused Cherokee baby girl outside a bar in Oklahoma. She names the baby Turtle, for her habit of "holding on."The Bean Tree is in many ways the story of Taylor's growth and maturation, as she begins to realize her place in a vast world and learns to accept the possibility of love, both romantic and parental. Taylor contrasts with Lou Ann Ruiz who settled in Tucson with her baby, Dwayne Ray. Her husband, Angel, has just walked out on her when the story begins, and Taylor and Turtle move in with her.
    ...
    remain intact.
    Taylor
    Taylor cares for the abandoned and the exiled with increasing enthusiasm as the novel progresses. Taylor is an archetypal
    hero: she leaves her home and family, descends into darkness, and reemerges to accomplish some good for the sake of her society. She also functions as Esperanza's comedic counterpart. Whereas tragedy permanently enshrouds Esperanza'ls life, Taylor has a chance to hold on to her daughter and her happiness. Unlike She becomes even woldier after learning about the political corruption and personal tragedy faced by Estevan and Esperanza and the abuse inflicted on Turtle. Her sympathetic reaction to the difficulties of others reveals Taylor's tenderheartedness
    aylor
    cares for
    Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. Far more womanly in a traditional sense than Taylor is, she pines for her husband and expresses her conviction that marriages and love should last forever. But, she undergoes a transformation from dependent housewife into strong single mother. She searches for a job and accepts that she will have to support herself. She acts more boldly, scolding Taylor when Taylor does not fight hard for her rights.
    Lou Ann is both a new mother and recently separated from her husband, Angel, who leaves her on Halloween, shortly before she gives birth to a son, Dwayne Ray. Lou Ann is a bundle of neuroses and fears, considering every single unlikely calamity that may befall her or her son because of a dream that she considered prophetic that foretold that her son would not live to see the year two thousand. In contrast to the confident Taylor, who becomes her roommate, Lou Ann is perpetually worried about what others will think about her, and fears saying the wrong thing and offending friends who may abandon her. However, through the course of the novel Lou Ann becomes more confident and calm, particularly after taking a job at Red Hot Mama's salsa factory and channeling her nervous energy into fervor for work there.
    ...
    more self-confidence. In the end, Lou Ann and Taylor form a functional family, caring for their children and for each other.
    She
    She and Taylor
    ...
    and positive. In the end, Lou Ann and Taylor form a functional family, caring for their children and for each other.
    (view changes)
    2:03 pm
  7. page Luzmina Garner edited Compare/ conrast Taylor Green and Lou Ann Ruiz: Different people, similar lives In The Bean Tre…
    Compare/ conrast Taylor Green and Lou Ann Ruiz: Different people, similar lives
    In The Bean Tree, Kingsolver focuses on a young woman, Taylor Greer, who develops a strong social conscience through her experiences with an abandoned child, and a pair of Guatemalan Refugees. The Protagonist of the novel, Taylor is determined to avoid becoming a pregnant teen. Her early years in Eastern Kentucky have been heavily influence by her perception that Pittman County is "behind the nation in practically every way you can think of, except the rate of teenage pregnancies.” Taylor is independent and assertive, believing that she does not need and will never need a man, and firmly avoids marriage and children until, upon finally leaving Pittman County; she ac­quires an unwanted and abused Cherokee baby girl outside a bar in Oklahoma. She names the baby Turtle, for her habit of "holding on."The Bean Tree is in many ways the story of Taylor's growth and maturation, as she begins to realize her place in a vast world and learns to accept the possibility of love, both romantic and parental. Taylor contrasts with Lou Ann Ruiz who settled in Tucson with her baby, Dwayne Ray. Her husband, Angel, has just walked out on her when the story begins, and Taylor and Turtle move in with her.
    Taylor Greer is brave; practical and unpredictable young woman. Taylor’s spirited, quirky voice shapes the novel. She perceives things in an original fashion, communicating her wonder at the customs and landscape of the Southwest with unusual metaphors and folksy language. Taylor settles in Tucson, Arizona, because its landscape strikes her as outlandish; newness and amusement appeal to her more than comfort or familiarity. As she contends with dangerous poverty, an unasked-for child, and many other trials, Taylor’s wit and spirit remain intact.
    Taylor cares for the abandoned and the exiled with increasing enthusiasm as the novel progresses. Mattie calls her a hero for risking her own safety in order to achieve a more just society. In some ways, Taylor is an archetypal hero: she leaves her home and family, descends into darkness, and reemerges to accomplish some good for the sake of her society. She also functions as Esperanza’s comedic counterpart. Whereas tragedy permanently enshrouds Esperanza’s life, Taylor has a chance to hold on to her daughter and her happiness. Unlike traditional female heroines, Taylor’s adventures do not revolve around finding or keeping a man. Her life focuses instead on females—primarily on Turtle-- but also on her mother, her friend, and her mentor. The male-female love she experiences remains purely platonic. She becomes even worldlier after learning about the political corruption and personal tragedy faced by Estevan and Esperanza and the abuse inflicted on Turtle. Her sympathetic reaction to the difficulties of others reveals Taylor’s tenderheartedness.
    Lou Ann is soft, motherly, and worrisome; she fears her own death and the death of her child. Far more womanly in a traditional sense than Taylor is, she pines for her husband and expresses her conviction that marriages and love should last forever. But, she undergoes a transformation from dependent housewife into strong single mother. She searches for a job and accepts that she will have to support herself. She acts more boldly, scolding Taylor when Taylor does not fight hard for her rights.
    Lou Ann is both a new mother and recently separated from her husband, Angel, who leaves her on Halloween, shortly before she gives birth to a son, Dwayne Ray. Lou Ann is a bundle of neuroses and fears, considering every single unlikely calamity that may befall her or her son because of a dream that she considered prophetic that foretold that her son would not live to see the year
    two charactersthousand. In contrast to the confident Taylor, who becomes her roommate, Lou Ann is perpetually worried about what others will think about her, and fears saying the wrong thing and offending friends who may abandon her. However, through the course of the novel Lou Ann becomes more confident and calm, particularly after taking a job at Red Hot Mama's salsa factory and channeling her nervous energy into fervor for work there.
    Lou Ann is more uptight, strict, and very protective over Dwayne-Ray. Whereas Taylor is more free will and lets Turtle do her own thing, but they both still adore their children very much. The difference between Lou Ann and Taylor is that Lou Ann is depressed throughout most of the book and Taylor is upbeat and positive. The different ways of Taylor being stable and Lou Ann's being insecure eventually lend them to be the perfect roommates and the best of friends. Taylor is quite confident and headstrong. She is unwavering in her determination, and frequently sustains herself through the confidence in her that her mother and her best friend, Lou Ann Ruiz, feel. After spending time with Taylor, who is a strong person, Lou Ann takes steps that allow her to gain more self-confidence. In the end, Lou Ann and Taylor form a functional family, caring for their children and for each other.
    She and Taylor form a functional family, caring for their children and for each other. The difference between Lou Ann and Taylor is that Lou Ann is depressed throughout most of the book and Taylor is upbeat and positive.

    (view changes)
    1:23 pm

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